Jan. 6 committee just made history. How will history judge it?


The Jan. 6 committee’s unanimous vote Monday to refer Donald Trump to the Department of Justice for possible prosecution of inciting insurrection and other federal crimes was historic. For the first time, Congress has urged criminal prosecution against a former or current chief executive. 

But the panel’s most lasting legacy may be its story. After all this time, it is still shocking to hear the details of the attempt to overturn the 2020 presidential election, and its culmination in a mob smashing its way into the U.S. Capitol.

Why We Wrote This

The Jan. 6 committee seems to have aimed its work at history, rather than the short-term political cycle. On Monday, it made some of its own, for the first time recommending that a former president be prosecuted on criminal charges.

We don’t know what history will say about this period of American politics. But the Jan. 6 documentation appears to be the kind of evidence on which history is based. 

In that sense the hearings were reminiscent of other noteworthy efforts, such as the Senate Watergate committee or the Army-McCarthy hearings of 1954, says Joanne Freeman, professor of American history at Yale University.

“What resonates again and again and again in these public moments … [is] if there’s a way to get a broad sweep of the public to see what’s happening, to think about what’s happening, and to watch at least some people stand up and say, ‘That crossed the line,’ that’s really important,” says Professor Freeman.

The congressional Select Committee to Investigate the January 6th Attack on the United States Capitol, which held its final public meeting Monday, was in many ways a pathbreaking legislative effort.

Its slick production raised the standard for hearing presentations. Its investigations produced volumes of evidence implicating former President Donald Trump and his allies. It kept the issue of culpability for the attacks in the media glare.

Its vote to refer Mr. Trump to the Department of Justice for possible prosecution of inciting insurrection and other federal crimes was historic: For the first time, Congress has urged criminal prosecution against a former or current U.S. chief executive. 

Why We Wrote This

The Jan. 6 committee seems to have aimed its work at history, rather than the short-term political cycle. On Monday, it made some of its own, for the first time recommending that a former president be prosecuted on criminal charges.

But the panel’s most lasting legacy may be its story. After all this time, it is still shocking to hear the details of the attempt to overturn the 2020 presidential election, and its culmination in a mob smashing its way into the U.S. Capitol.

Brick by brick, the Jan. 6 panel has constructed an epic tale, from the former president, seemingly off-the-cuff, claiming he had actually won on the night of the election, to shouting matches in the Oval Office over false claims of election fraud, to Mr. Trump’s nonresponsiveness as the Capitol riot commenced.



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